Testing at home for HIV is convenient
and confidential

Safe & discreet self-testing kit at home

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How it works

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Discreet package

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Results instant or 72 hrs

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Clinical Support

What is in the HIV self-test kit?

Fettle offers two options for self-testing - a blood sample kit, with results in 72 hours, or the Insti HIV test for instant results. You can also customise your own self-test kit, and choose which of the other most common infections to test for. Learn more about STIs/STDs.

Fettle blood sample kit

This test uses a blood sample, collected from a finger prick. The kit contains:

an alcohol swab to clean your finger

a small lancet to make a tiny cut in your fingertip

a sample tube

plasters.

You'll need to prick your finger with the lancet, and drop a small amount of blood into the sample tube. Watch the instruction video here.

You'll need to return your samples to our lab in the freepost envelope provided.

When you order you can customise your kit and choose which of the 6 most common infections to test for.

Order self sample kit from £23

Insti HIV test

If you'd like to get your results immediately, you can use this test. The instant test kit contains:

a small lancet

testing solutions

testing vessel

plasters.

You'll need to prick your finger with the lancet, to collect one drop of blood. You'll be able to see your result within a few minutes.

If the result is reactive, two spots will appear. Watch the instruction video here. The result should be clear and obvious. If you are unsure, you can ask our clinicians for advice.

Order Insti test £19.50

How do I choose which test kit to use?

Both of the HIV test kits can be done discreetly, at home. Choosing a test depends on how you feel about taking blood, and reading your own results. Here are some things to think about:

Fettle blood sample kit

results within 72 hours

samples tested by an accredited laboratory

results reviewed by a specialist sexual health clinician

requires about 16 drops of blood

You can use this test four weeks after potential infection.

Some people find it hard to get enough blood from their finger, or do not like to take their own blood as it makes them feel queasy.

When you order you can customise your kit and choose which of the 6 most common infections to test for.

Order self sample kit from £23

Insti HIV test

results within a few minutes

you'll need to interpret your own results

requires one drop of blood

You can use this test four weeks after potential infection.

Although the Insti test is easier to do (for most people), some people feel anxious about reading their own results and prefer to have their results processed by our laboratory.

Once you've placed an order, you can contact the Fettle clinical team for advice and support before and after testing.

Order Insti test £19.50

What do the results mean?

The Fettle home test kit will check for HIV antibodies in your blood, and will show either a negative result, or a ‘reactive' result. A reactive result means that you may have the infection. As with any HIV test, whether completed in a clinic or at home, you'll need to have additional testing to confirm a positive result. Our clinicians can talk you through this if you do receive a reactive result.

Should I get tested?

If you think you may have been exposed to HIV in the last three days, you should go to your local sexual health clinic immediately to get PEP. PEP is a medication that can prevent infection even after exposure, if taken within 72 hours.

The sooner that you start this medication, the more likely it is to be effective. Many people carry HIV without knowing it. If you have had unprotected sex, particularly if you have changed partners, are a man who has sex with men, or have multiple partners, you should take a regular HIV test.

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It can take up to 4 weeks for HIV to show up in tests

How long do Fettle HIV self-test results take?

For the instant test kit, you'll be able to read your own results within just a few minutes.

For the blood sample kit, we'll deliver your results within 72 hours of receiving your samples. If your result is negative, we'll send you a text message with your result as soon as it is available. If your sample shows a reactive result, one of our clinicians will call you to explain the next stage of testing, and help you find your nearest clinic.

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We deliver results
within72 hours

What are HIV symptoms?

HIV infection can cause a flu like illness a few weeks after infection. After this, people living with HIV usually remain symptom free for many years.

However, as their immune system becomes weaker they are less able to fight common infections, which can become serious. People living with HIV are more likely to develop certain cancers, as the immune system plays a role in preventing cancer development.

In its final stage, HIV infection will develop into AIDS. This is when the immune system is so weak that it is unable to fight most infections, so common conditions could become fatal.

Modern HIV treatment is highly effective. Although it cannot cure HIV infection it can keep people well. With the right treatment people who are HIV positive have normal lifespans. HIV treatment also reduces the risk of passing on HIV infection.

When should I get tested for HIV?

HIV can take a number of weeks to show up in a test from the time of infection. This is known as a ‘window period.'

For both the blood sample kit and Insti test, you should wait four weeks before testing.

If you are not sure when you might have been exposed to the infection, you should do a test now, and another test at a later date. Our clinicians can help advise you about this when you place an order with Fettle.

What is HIV and how is it transmitted?

HIV is an infection caused by a virus that attacks the body's immune system. It is most commonly passed on through vaginal or anal sex without a condom.

It can also be passed from mother to child at birth. HIV can be transmitted when injecting drug users share needles or unsterilised equipment. In rare cases, it can be transmitted through transfusion of infected blood.

How is HIV treated?

Currently there is no cure for HIV, but there are treatments that enable most people to live a long and healthy life. Most treatments for HIV involve taking antiviral medications. If your result is reactive, our clinicians can answer your questions about potential treatment if a positive result is confirmed.

Shall I tell my partner(s) I have HIV?

You should tell your partner(s) if you think you have been infected with HIV as it is important they get tested. They could pass on the infection to others, or could face very serious symptoms if they are not aware that they need treatment. If you are receiving treatment and have an undetectable viral load, there is no risk of passing on the infection to your partner, so it is not necessary to tell your partner unless you feel it would be helpful to talk about it.

If you are worried about talking to sexual partners about your HIV status, there are charities and support groups that can help. The best way to protect yourself and your partner from infection is to use a condom every time you have sex.

Read more about how to talk your partner on the Terrence Higgins Trust website.

If you have an STI, you should tell all of your current sexual partners and anyone else you've had sex with in the last 6 months

Does HIV affect fertility?

Without treatment, HIV can affect the way that your body produces the hormones oestrogen and progestogen. This means that your menstrual cycle may change, making it more difficult to get pregnant, or you may experience early menopause. However, if you are receiving treatment, the effects on your hormones should be reduced, and living with HIV should not prevent you from becoming pregnant.

Without treatment, there is a risk that you will pass the infection to your baby. This risk is greatly reduced if you are receiving appropriate treatment. You may need to take additional medication to prevent the infection from passing to your baby. There are some medications which can be harmful to your baby in the womb, so you would need to discuss your treatment plan with your clinician.

There are also ways that you can conceive safely (without increasing the risk of your partner contracting the infection). If you receive a reactive result and are thinking about becoming pregnant, or are already pregnant, Fettle clinicians can discuss your options if a positive result is confirmed.

FAQ

Where can I get help with the Fettle blood sample kit?

You'll need to drop a very small amount of blood into the sample tube. You can watch the blood test instruction video or follow this link to see the instruction leaflet that comes with the kit.

How to avoid HIV

Condoms are an effective way to prevent HIV infection. You can order male and female condoms here. Regular STI testing every time you change sexual partner helps to prevent the spread of infections.

What is PEP?

Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is a medication that can prevent you from becoming infected with HIV, if taken correctly. Treatment must be started within 72 hours of exposure to infection for it to be effective.

Find out more about PEP on the Terrence Higgins Trust website.

The best way to avoid HIV infection during sex is by using a condom.

What is PrEP?

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a course of medication taken before sex to reduce the risk of getting HIV. Find out more about PrEP on the Terrence Higgins Trust website.

The best way to avoid HIV infection during sex is by using a condom.

Why do I need to do another test if I get a positive result?

The Fettle home test kit will check for HIV antibodies in your blood, and will show either a negative result, or a ‘reactive' result. A reactive result means that you may have the infection. As with any HIV test, whether completed in a clinic or at home, you'll need to have additional testing to confirm a positive result. Our clinicians can talk you through this if you do receive a reactive result including helping you to find your nearest clinic. The clinic will take another blood sample so that they can run multiple confirmatory tests.

If you receive a negative result, you do not need to take another test unless you think you have been exposed to the infection again.

Can my partner tell if I have HIV?

Your partner may be able to tell if you have symptoms but not if you do not. If you do receive a positive result, you may find it useful to discuss with your partner, so that they understand what the result means and what treatment options are available.

Tests we offer

  • HIV£23
  • Syphilis£23
  • Genital Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea£26
  • Rectal Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea£26
  • Oral Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea£26
  • Hepatitis B£26
  • Hepatitis C£26

Save up to 20% when you buy multiple tests.

Choose your test