Contraception by post

Your choice of contraception. Prescribed online, delivered to your door.

Contraception from Fettle

If you know what kind of contraception you’re looking for you can select one from below:

illustration of a hand holding an emergency hormonal contraceptive pill

Emergency contraception

From £15.00

Choose a morning after pill
Illustration of a hand holding a combined pill packet

Combined pill

From £19.00

Choose your pill
illustration of a hand holding a progestogen only pill packet

Progestogen only pill

From £18.00

Choose your mini pill
SyreniRing packet

Contraceptive ring

A small, soft plastic ring that you place inside your vagina
Evra patch packet

Contraceptive patch

A small, sticky patch that sticks to your skin
Sayana Press packet

Contraceptive injection

An injection that you can give yourself

How it works

Order online

Choose your contraception and tell us a bit about your health, allergies, any medication you take and your family history.

Review and prescribe

We might text you for more information before we can prescribe. Once our team have done your prescription, the pharmacy will have it dispatched within 1 working day.

Free discreet delivery

Delivery is included. Your order will be delivered in unbranded packaging by 1st Class post. We'll send you updates and a tracking code by text message.

Support & advice

Our expert clinicians are here to help with any questions or concerns. We will send you a text to remind you to reorder when your prescription is due to run out.

Our contraception

Contraception helps you control if and when you become pregnant. Many people find that hormonal contraception affects other things, such as their mood, their periods or their desire to have sex.

Try different methods to find what works best for you. Keep a record of how you feel and how each method affects your body and mind. Think about whether you want to use a hormonal or non-hormonal method, how often you want to take it, the side effects (good and less good) and the risks and benefits to your health.

It can take time to find the right type of contraception. We’re here to help.

Combined pill

£19.00 - £85.00

Take 1 pill a day.

Can increase your risk of blood clots (thrombosis), breast cancer and cervical cancer.

Can make periods regular, lighter and less painful.

Common side effects: Mood changes, nausea, and breast tenderness.

91% effective with typical use.

Progestogen only pill

£18.00 - £65.00

Take 1 pill a day.

Can stop your period, make it lighter or cause irregular bleeding throughout the month.

Common side effects: Spotty skin and changes to your mood or sex drive.

91% effective with typical use.

Contraceptive patch

Replace with a new patch every 7 days.

Can increase your risk of blood clots (thrombosis), breast cancer and cervical cancer.

Can make periods regular, lighter and less painful.

Common side effects: Mood changes, nausea, and breast tenderness.

91% effective with typical use.

Contraceptive ring

Leave ring in for 3 weeks (21 days).

Can increase your risk of blood clots (thrombosis), breast cancer and cervical cancer.

Can make periods regular, lighter and less painful.

Common side effects: Mood changes, nausea, and breast tenderness.

91% effective with typical use.

Contraceptive injection

Self-inject every 13 weeks.

Can reduce bone density over time, but this returns to usual levels once you stop using the injection.

Can make periods lighter, heavier, irregular or stop altogether.

Common side effects: Spotty skin, weight gain, or changes to your mood or sex drive.

94% with typical use.

Emergency contraception

£15.00 - £52.00

Take 1 dose.

Next period may come earlier or be delayed.

Side effects are rare.

Effective up to 3 or 5 days after unprotected sex, depending on which type you use.

Other contraceptive options

We can't offer all contraceptives on Fettle as some require consultations or fitting in person.

Find out more about other contraceptive options and where you can get them.

Hormonal coil (IUS)

Small, T-shaped device inserted into your womb that releases progestogen.

Fitted at a clinic or GP surgery.

Lasts for 3 or 5 years.

Can make periods lighter, irregular or stop altogether.

Headaches, changes to skin or mood, breast tenderness.

99% effective.

Non-hormonal copper coil (IUD)

Small, T-shaped device inserted into your womb.

Fitted at a clinic or GP surgery.

Lasts for 5 or 10 years.

Can make periods heavier or more painful in first few months.

No hormonal side effects.

99% effective.

Contraceptive implant

Small plastic rod that sits under the skin and releases the hormone progestogen.

Fitted at a clinic or GP surgery.

Works for 3 years.

Can make periods lighter, irregular or stop completely.

Headaches, changes to skin or mood, breast tenderness.

Over 99% effective.

Condoms

The only type of contraception that can prevent pregnancy and protect against STIs.

Get them free at sexual health clinics. Or buy them from pharmacies and other shops.

Easy to put on yourself.

No side effects.

79-82% for typical use.

Contraceptive diaphragm or cap

A silicone dome that covers the cervix.

Visit a pharmacy or buy online.

Use it yourself before sex.

Won’t cause changes to your period.

Side effects are rare. Some people are allergic to the spermicide.

82% effective with typical use.

Choosing contraception

There are many types of contraception that can help you control if and when you become pregnant. Finding the right method for you can take some time. And you might end up trying a few different options.

Remember, the only way to protect against STIs is to use a condom when you have sex. Other types of contraception can prevent pregnancy but they won’t protect against STIs.

Things to think about when choosing contraception:

  • how effective are the different methods?

  • can you make contraception part of your daily routine, like taking a tablet every day?

  • would you prefer a method you don’t have to think about so often?

  • are you happy to use contraception that contains hormones?

  • what are your periods like, and how will contraception affect them?

  • do you want to get pregnant soon?

  • what are the longer term risks?

  • will it help you with other conditions, like PCOS or endometriosis?

You’ll also need to consider your medical history and any other medications you take, as some contraception won’t work well with certain other medications. Your age, weight and if you smoke can also affect which contraceptives are right for you. We’ll ask about all this when you order.

We have detailed information about each of the contraceptives we offer to help you make a choice. Choose a contraceptive method to find out more.

Can I be pregnant while on the pill?

The combined pill is more than 99% effective if taken perfectly and 91% effective if taken as most people take it (with some missed or late pills). So, a small percentage of people become pregnant while taking the pill.

How many times can you take the morning after pill?

There is no limit to the number of times you can take emergency hormonal contraception in a lifetime.

However, using emergency contraception pills repeatedly is not recommended as a regular method of contraception.

Who will sign my prescription?

One of Fettle’s GMC Doctors or NMC registered nurse prescribers will review your answers and sign your prescription.

How quickly will my order arrive?

We’ll send your order by Tracked 1st Class Royal Mail. Delivery is included in the price. Contraception is sent on the 48hr service, and emergency contraception on the 24hr service.

If you order emergency contraception, and we are unable to deliver it in time for it to be effective, we will let you know during the order process and help you find your nearest sexual health clinic or pharmacy.

Can I request a record of my previous contraception orders from Fettle?

Yes, once you have ordered contraception from Fettle, you can email info@fettle.health.

Can I track my order?

Yes. You will receive a text with a tracking link once it has been dispatched.

Written by Antigoni Kaliviotis. Nurse Prescriber
Reviewed by Dr Paula Baraitser. Medical Director

Do you need help with something else?